Property

Sale of property to bring Alabama Cancer Care Network facility to Gadsden

The sale of the City of Gadsden property to the Alabama Cancer Care Network has been completed, with the city receiving $597,000 – along with a new option in the area for patients to receive cancer care.

“This development is important for creating jobs and improving the quality of life for Gadsden residents,” said Gadsden Mayor Craig Ford.

The $6.5 million investment by the Alabama Cancer Care Network will create between 15 and 20 healthcare jobs in Gadsden, as well as positions for three physicians. The planned annual staff budget will be $3 million.

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The plan has been in the works for some time and was made public in August when ACCN CEO Keith Whitley spoke to Gadsden council members about plans to build the center in Gadsden.

Alabama Cancer Care has a partnership with Riverview Regional Medical Center in Gadsden and working relationships with UAB and other hospitals in the state.

The sale of the property was finalized after being approved in August by the previous city council and administration.

“This facility will be state of the art, and the beautiful location near the Coosa River will hopefully bring some comfort to those who are suffering and undergoing treatment,” Ford said.

The land is located downtown at the corner of South First Street and Riverside Drive, which offers picturesque views of the Coosa River that will be the focus of the architectural design. When discussing the project in August, the therapeutic benefits of the location were noted.

“This development is also a great example of why investment in IDA Gadsden-Etowah is crucial and why it is important that IDA Director David Hooks works to put these agreements in place. “, Ford said.

“IDA has targeted healthcare as a primary industry for recruitment, and this development is one of the first major projects in this category,” Hooks said.

“We can’t wait to see it come out of the ground soon,” he added.

Speaking about the project in August, Whitley said market research looked at areas that are underserved for cancer treatment and those with large numbers of patients traveling to larger markets for treatment. He said Gadsden is one of those areas where people migrate to big cities for treatment.

The treatment center should allow patients to receive chemotherapy and radiotherapy locally, he said, rather than adding the expense and difficulty of an hour or more of driving to Birmingham to the stress of their illness.

Whitley said when the company embarked on this business plan in 1995, he knew it would have to work with indigent patients and work to support them.

“If you walk through our door, we’ll find a way to treat you,” he said.